Our Little Secret: There Is No Mandatory Child Abuse Reporting Protocol in Barbados. Imagine That!

barbados-child-abuseJustice delayed is justice denied. Who is taking credit for all THE CHILDREN (indicted by the rising numbers reported) that continue being ABUSED and NEGLECTED while YEAR after YEAR public officials say that a protocol is being “DRAFTED”????

Why are the schools, parents, child care service providers, boards, agencies, churches, etc. NOT kept abreast of the developments as well as being involved in a PUBLIC FORUM to ensure the SAFETY AND PROTECTION OF THE CHILDREN in the interim for the sake of PUBLIC AWARENESS AND HEALTH?
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/nakeddeparture/2015/04/29/marsha-hinds-layne-talks-about-the-endangered-youth-in-barbados–episode-17#.VUFNzMemEiU.facebook


2015

THERE WERE MORE reported cases of child abuse in Barbados last year than in 2013, but officials are still claiming some element of success.

There were 77 more cases, bringing the total number to 1 745.

Stressing there was no joy in the additional cases, chairman of the national committee monitoring the Rights of the Child, Faith Marshall-Harris, said it possibly meant that more people were coming forward to report cases and that it was a “helpful sign”. Marshall-Harris said she drafted the Mandatory Reporting of Child Abuse protocol last year, which said people must report all incidents of child abuse wherever they see it. She was speaking at the launch of activities for child month, which starts on Friday. (YB) – See more at: http://www.nationnews.com/nationnews/news/66782/reports-child-abuse#sthash.ldnzCRDu.dpuf


2012

Mandatory Reporting Protocol By Year-End by Lisa Bayley Published on April 27, 2012

Director of the Child Care Board, Joan Crawford, is hoping to have the Mandatory Reporting Protocol to assist with the management of child abuse in hand, by year-end.

She made this disclosure recently during a press conference at the Warrens Office Complex, to launch Child Month activities, being celebrated in May. 

The Protocol, Ms. Crawford noted would offer a greater level of protection to the nation’s children by identifying and correcting some of the inadequacies that currently exist in responding to child abuse.

“What this will do is set out the standards that persons involved in working with children should adopt.  For example, reporting times, how the evidence will be collected, etcetera.  So, in essence what we would be doing is helping the agencies that are involved in child abuse to prepare the evidence better and have it forwarded in a timely manner… In addition to that, we continue to work with the Royal Barbados Police Force to ensure that the referrals are investigated in a timely manner and that whatever information we have, we forward to them, because ultimately the process lies with the Police and the Director of Public Prosecutions when it come to the cases being addressed in the court system,” she explained. Child abuse reports, whether emotional, physical, neglect or sexual, are sometimes submitted to the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, private doctors, the Ministry of Education, the church, police, or non-governmental social care organisations. However, some cases are not reported for various reasons, and even if they are reported, the information is often not conveyed to the Board, which has legislative responsibility for the care and protection of the island’s children. The CCB head expressed concern that some parents refused to or did not allow children to give evidence.  “Through our public education we try to let parents know that it is an offence and justice needs to be done.  However, there is the concern that it is very traumatic for the children to go through the court system and then sometimes persons are of the view that if there is a child as a result of the [sexual] assault, prosecuting the child’s father is a problem,” she remarked.  To address this, the CCB also runs a survivor group to prepare children who have been the victims of assault for the court process.   Last year, 10 girls who were sexually assaulted participated in a survivors’ therapy group for a six-week period. With the Protocol, Ms. Crawford suggested that the CCB would be in a better position to collate statistics and manage the process of dealing with child abuse victims and perpetrators.  However, better collaboration among social care agencies, was key for a proper functioning Protocol.  lisa.bayley@barbados.gov.bb http://www.gisbarbados.gov.bb/plugins/p2_news/printarticle.php?p2_articleid=8028


2010

Consultation Soon On Mandatory Reporting Protocol

Published on March 2, 2010 by Sharon Austin-Gill-Moore

Government is taking steps to develop a Mandatory Reporting Protocol to assist with the management of child abuse. To this end, the Division of Family of the Ministry of Youth, Family and Sports, in collaboration with the Child Care Board (CCB), will be hosting a one-day consultation for its stakeholders on Wednesday, March 10, at Hilton Barbados. Minister with responsibility for that portfolio, Dr. Esther Byer Suckoo, will deliver the feature address during the opening ceremony. Attorney-at-Law/Consultant, Jacqueline Sealy-Burke, will discuss “Child Protection: Why the Need for a Mandatory Reporting Protocol”, and “Towards the Creation of a National Reporting Protocol: Developing a Universal Form and Legal Issues”. Director of the Child Care Board, Joan Crawford, underscored the importance of the protocol, explaining that it would offer a greater level of protection to the nation’s children.  “It would help us to take those very necessary steps in identifying and correcting some of the inadequacies that currently exist in responding to child abuse. “Some child abuse cases, whether emotional, physical, neglect or sexual, are not always reported for various reasons, and even if they are reported, the information is often times not conveyed to the Child Care Board, which has legislative responsibility for the care and protection of the island’s children,” Ms. Crawford stated. She asserted that with the protocol, the CCB would be in a better position to collate statistics, and manage the process of dealing with child abuse victims and perpetrators. The official said: “Both the Ministry and the Board are fully cognisant that other measures and systems would have to be put in place or operating more efficiently to give proper effect to a Mandatory Reporting Protocol.” Ms. Crawford identified a number of areas, including the legal system and better collaboration among social care agencies, as key for a proper functioning protocol. Child abuse reports are sometimes made to the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, private doctors, the Ministry of Education, the church, police, or non-governmental social care organisations. saustin@barbados.gov.bb via http://gisbarbados.gov.bb/index.php?categoryid=3&p2_articleid=3343


According to notes compiled during Barbados – 15th Session – 2012 Friday 25th January 2013 – 9.00 a.m. – 12.30 p.m from reports submitted to CHILDREN’S RIGHTS IN THE UNIVERSAL PERIODIC REVIEW recorded by the Children’s Rights International Network:

UNICEF noted that Barbados rejected the notion that it required appropriate legislative and administrative measures to combat domestic violence and physical abuse of children. With further regard to the UPR recommendation on “taking appropriate legislative and administrative measures to fight against domestic violence and physical abuse of children, and engage in an exchange of information with those countries that are developing best practices in these fields”, UNICEF noted that the reporting procedure was an area that needed attention. Barbados did not have mandatory reporting requirements, a situation that appeared to have compromised efforts to create a centralised system to handle all child abuse cases. In the absence of any written policies or protocols, consistent reporting of child abuse to the Child Care Board was left to chance. There were a few oral protocols with some agencies, but generally reporting was discretionary and occurred on an ad hoc basis.

FURTHERMORE

AI also regretted that Barbados rejected recommendations intended to ensure that Barbados adheres to its international human rights obligations towards children. In particular Barbados rejected the recommendations to eliminate all forms of corporal punishment from its legislation and discourage its use in schools.


HOW MANY MORE CHILDREN’S LIVES WILL BE DESTROYED WHILE WE WAIT???

“Time itself is neutral; it can be used either destructively or constructively. More and more I feel that the people of ill will have used time much more effectively than have the people of good will. We will have to repent in this generation not merely for the hateful words and actions of the bad people but for the appalling silence of the good people. Human progress never rolls in on wheels of inevitability; it comes through the tireless efforts of men willing to work to be co-workers with God, and without this hard work, time itself becomes an ally of the forces of social stagnation. We must use time creatively, in the knowledge that the time is always ripe to do right.” ― Martin Luther King Jr., Why We Can’t Wait

I want to know what kind of mirror image do you have of yourself? Do you really like yourselves? There are too many people in Barbados who despise themselves and their dislike of themselves reflects itself in their dislike of other people. A quote from Errol Barrow and the Mirror Image Speech

-Tru Focus-

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